spring [semester] has sprung!

Winter term was a frantic month but somehow I pulled off the grades I was aiming for. After a rough start, I had to reassess the situation. Initially, I upped my hours for the two weeks off during Christmas break. I thought that since my lectures were online I would be okay with continuing to take on extra shifts. I was working about 6-8 hours a day during the week but I also had weekly exams and a weekly lab that was 6 hours. I bit off more than I could chew and became stressed out. I realized that my grades were suffering so I did something I rarely do, I went to the professor’s office hours! From her emails and recorded online lectures, most of the students in my cohort got the vibe that she was one of those nurses who eat their young. I decided I had nothing to lose by going in to review my exam and ask her what I could do to improve. She ended up being totally welcoming and reasonable. When a group of us walked in, it only took a few minutes to realize that her email responses to other students that came off as short, cold, or rudeĀ  were just misinterpretations of her dark and unfiltered sense of humor. Once I figured that out, she was easy to talk to and I ended up being frank and open with her right back. When she asked the group for feedback on the class so far, I told her I felt that having two exams worth 35% each was a bit extreme and not consistent with any other courses I’ve taken. She was receptive and ended up changing the syllabus and adding two more points to our already curved previous exam. Moral of the story, it’s true what they say about office hours. If you are struggling in a course or even just not doing as well as you’d hoped: GO!

Another A and A- in the books, but I’m a few days away from the first round of spring semester exams. I’ve been procrastinating all weekend and I even have an extra day off from classes today to take advantage of but I’m off to a slow start. I feel as though I’ve done a decent job of keeping up in classes and not letting myself get behind with material I don’t understand, but I know deep down I don’t fully grasp the content. This is a problem of mine I’ve noticed before. Because some of the content we’re learning in the Med-Surg courses overlaps with what we’ve already covered in pathophysiology and pharmacology, I get bored in class and end up not paying attention. Couple that with the fact that I feel like I have “real world experience” in some topics, like caring for patients on mechanical ventilation, I think it gives me a false sense of security. The way my brain works, once I hear something once and I easily retain the information. This helped me get through my first degree with minimal studying. Of course, nursing school does not work that way! Instead of reading or skimming the chapters, I’m focusing on just completing NCLEX questions on the topics we’re covering. That is something new I’m trying since the accelerated students have been specifically warned that Med-Surg is a GPA killer for students who aren’t as comfortable with answering NCLEX questions. Another method that has worked for me in previous nursing classes so far is buying the supplemental study guides or lab guides that go along with the required textbooks. They’re not on the syllabus as “recommended” purchases in most of the classes, but they pop up on Amazon when I order the textbooks so I get them too. The questions are based on the chapters in the textbook and I’ve even found some professors will base their tests around these questions or at least will the tests are very similar. I’m going to see how that works for me in the next few weeks but I think the best advice I got about nursing school before starting was not to waste your time passively studying and just do questions and read the rationales.

As far as work goes, I am not stretching myself thin this semester. When I first started my job it was my entire world and top priority. I still love going to work and love the kids there very much, but I have accepted the fact that it is a job and I am allowed to have a life outside of the facility. Obviously, school has to come first but having a significant other/romantic relationship is not a death sentence for my goals either. It may be considered good or bad timing, but my BF is leaving on military orders this week for three weeks. It’s just training so I will have nothing to worry about and since we won’t physically be together it may be easier to buckle down and study on the weekends. Who knows how it will all turn out this semester? Time to find out.

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that pharmacology test

Everyone left the pharmacology test feeling totally defeated. My study group went straight to the bar to ease our pain. During our simulation lab the next day, my cohort all had a lot to say about how it went. A few of the students mentioned that they had asked the professor specifically if the test was going to be NCLEX style and he said no, but of course the first thing he wrote on the board during the exam was: “think NCLEX!” Considering I have been teaching myself the content to prepare for the weekly quizzes, I hadn’t been paying enough attention in class to get the memo, so I did what felt like hundreds of NCLEX style questions on each chapter to prepare for the test.

My grade was just posted, I got an A-! I am literally trembling with joy over this, especially in light of the B- I earned on the first pathophysiology exam, it feels like such a triumph! While the majority of the points are still ahead of me, I have set off to a good start in this class.

“life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes…”

This semester has really taken off! Though I’m still at the beginning of this journey, I already feel like a completely different person. For as long as I can remember, I’ve always just skated by academically. I put in minimal effort, only studied for finals, and skipped class whenever I could. Though I was far from a star student, I still managed to get As and Bs in high school, plus maybe a couple Cs in college. I was well aware this method was not going to fly in nursing school, especially not for an accelerated BSN program. I had no idea if I would be able to actually put forth the effort and try. I’m only two quizzes and one test in, but I’ve gotten As on everything.

I’ll admit most of the credit goes to my new cohort friends. It turns out that sitting next to the girl I barely knew from high school was a great move. She introduced me to her very distant acquaintance also in the program and the three of us have been studying diligently together ever since. I’ve never studied in a group before, but we really hold each other accountable when we meet up and via text. During my first degree, I barely spoke to my classmates at all but I couldn’t imagine getting through any of this content on my own. We each have our strengths in certain areas, but these girls are very smart. Working with them challenges me to do better and it’s really paying off!