working with kidsĀ 

Sometimes, my job is filled with beautiful and rewarding experiences. Like watching a child go from nonverbal to saying your name whenever they see you, teaching a toddler with an oral aversion how to brush their teeth, and seeing joy on the face of a kid who discovered a new favorite food. Other days, you think you’re making progress with a behavioral issue but end up getting formula spit in your face. You win some, you lose some. 

Advertisements

that pharmacology test

Everyone left the pharmacology test feeling totally defeated. My study group went straight to the bar to ease our pain. During our simulation lab the next day, my cohort all had a lot to say about how it went. A few of the students mentioned that they had asked the professor specifically if the test was going to be NCLEX style and he said no, but of course the first thing he wrote on the board during the exam was: “think NCLEX!” Considering I have been teaching myself the content to prepare for the weekly quizzes, I hadn’t been paying enough attention in class to get the memo, so I did what felt like hundreds of NCLEX style questions on each chapter to prepare for the test.

My grade was just posted, I got an A-! I am literally trembling with joy over this, especially in light of the B- I earned on the first pathophysiology exam, it feels like such a triumph! While the majority of the points are still ahead of me, I have set off to a good start in this class.

Everything we learn applies to real life

One of our lectures in pathophysiology was on allergic response and anaphylaxis. It wasn’t long after that class that I had to apply my knowledge in a real life situation at work.

I was feeding a nonverbal resident a puree dinner. The contents are always labeled, but most of our PO residents have been at the facility for a while so it would be normal to assume that anything from dietary is safe for them to eat. After a few minutes of feeding the resident, I noticed a rash on the face and increased drooling. The puree was marked: “shrimp fried rice 8 oz”, so I instantly thought there must be an allergy to shellfish/seafood going on. I checked our computer charting system for allergies and only saw allergies listed that I already knew about. This resident often has a rash of some kind, it wasn’t that surprising for one to pop up, but something in my gut told me to discontinue the feeding anyway. I just monitored the resident while I finished charting the rest of the intakes. I brought the resident back to the living room, told her nurse what I observed, and asked her to take a look. Most of the rash had subsided but I said that it worried me and she said she would look into it.

Two weeks go by and I’m speaking with my supervisor, the speech language pathologist, about the changes in the food since our former food service manager came back to work after becoming a registered dietitian. I said that it seemed like our staple meals had been switched for more exotic recipes. After all, meals like creamed chip beef are pretty exotic compared to the turkey salad sandwiches the residents were used to! When discussing specific meals and food preferences, it came up that the resident did have a shellfish allergy after all.

Paying attention in class really did pay off! Instead of carrying out my work on autopilot, I made a potentially life-saving call based on my own clinical judgement. When I’m a nurse this will be something I have to do everyday, but as an aide/nursing student it was really cool to use the information I had recently gone over in class and apply it at work. Plus, if it wasn’t important, the professors wouldn’t be teaching it.

“life is a series of natural and spontaneous changes…”

This semester has really taken off! Though I’m still at the beginning of this journey, I already feel like a completely different person. For as long as I can remember, I’ve always just skated by academically. I put in minimal effort, only studied for finals, and skipped class whenever I could. Though I was far from a star student, I still managed to get As and Bs in high school, plus maybe a couple Cs in college. I was well aware this method was not going to fly in nursing school, especially not for an accelerated BSN program. I had no idea if I would be able to actually put forth the effort and try. I’m only two quizzes and one test in, but I’ve gotten As on everything.

I’ll admit most of the credit goes to my new cohort friends. It turns out that sitting next to the girl I barely knew from high school was a great move. She introduced me to her very distant acquaintance also in the program and the three of us have been studying diligently together ever since. I’ve never studied in a group before, but we really hold each other accountable when we meet up and via text. During my first degree, I barely spoke to my classmates at all but I couldn’t imagine getting through any of this content on my own. We each have our strengths in certain areas, but these girls are very smart. Working with them challenges me to do better and it’s really paying off!

All signs point in this direction

The first two weeks of classes have whizzed by. I’ve already done my first simulation lab, taken two quizzes, and have been studying my ass off. I truly have never worked this hard for anything academic in my life but I want to do it right this time. I have a little group to study with between classes and it’s paying off. I’ve never been one to obsess over grades, but I got a 100% on my first quiz. I’m finding that while a little effort has always gone a long way, 100% of your effort will take you much further.

My work schedule is a little different with more anticipated changes. The speech language pathologist I work under has been a great mentor and source of guidance. Being a member of the therapy department instead of the clinical staff has been challenging, especially because I work after standard office hours, but it is a rewarding endeavor. We have a lot of ideas in progress right now, so I’m just waiting for it all to get approved and take off.

Unfortunately, I also got some terrible news this week that my little sister was in the hospital. It was a rough situation and it was horrible to see her in so much pain, though I visited as much as I could. I am grateful that she is going to be okay. As awful as it was, this unfortunate circumstance gave me an opportunity to reflect on my path and find the silver lining: I truly have found my calling. Though I rarely let anyone see my softer and compassionate side, after this experience I feel certain that I have what it takes to become a nurse from my head to my heart.

First Week of School

Orientation for my accelerated BSN program was today. They didn’t really tell me anything I didn’t already know but it was the first time my cohort got to see each other. I went to high school with one girl in the program, but I don’t know anyone very well. Everyone says that nursing students get very close but I didn’t make many new friends during my first four years of college, so honestly I’m pretty nervous I won’t make any good friends. I guess I’ll see what tomorrow brings, class at 8am! As for now, I’m off to work. Time to throw on some scrubs and go.